HOW TO GROW CAMELLIAS

HOW TO GROW CAMELLIAS

Known for luxuriant blossoms that rival the most beautiful roses, camellias have been the pride of southern gardeners for years.

While envious northerners put gardens to bed for winter, their southern counterparts enjoyed glossy evergreen foliage and stunning cool-season camellia blooms.

Thanks to new cold-hardy varieties, gardeners outside the South can now experience the thrill of fall and winter camellia blossoms. Whatever your growing goals, these simple camellia essentials can help get you started: – Choosing Your Camellias – Selecting and Preparing a Site – Timing Camellia Plantings – Caring for Camellias Year-Round

CHOOSING YOUR CAMELLIAS Most of the camellias grown in U.S. gardens fall into one of two categories: the classic Japanese types or the sasanqua types.

Japanese camellias, known by the scientific name Camellia japonica, are the common camellia most people think of first. Depending on the region, Japanese camellias start blooming in mid-to-late winter and continue into early spring. Sasanqua camellias (Camellia sasanqua) bloom earlier in the camellia season,

flowering from mid-fall into early winter. Crosses between these and other camellia species may bloom throughout these cool seasons.

In choosing camellias for your garden, cold hardiness is an important consideration, especially in more northern regions.

Most camellia varieties flourish from U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 through 10, where extreme winter temperatures stay above zero degrees 

Fahrenheit.1 However, new camellia varieties — with names that hint at cold, such as Ice Angels, Snow Flurry and Winter's Star — withstand winters where temperatures dip as low as minus 10 F.

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